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Author/Organization: Lucretia Rishelle Banks, Walden University (Dissertations and Doctoral Studies Collection)

Brief Description:

As rapes and sexual assaults continue to occur on Historically Black College and
University (HBCU) campuses, students remain apprehensive in reporting victimizations
to law enforcement, despite the presence of sexual assault prevention and awareness
programming. Research has shown that the lack of reporting to law enforcement is based
on specific barriers. However, there is little knowledge on the perceptions of program
facilitators and administrators on why victims decline to report to law enforcement. This
qualitative phenomenological study gathered the perceptions of eight program facilitators
and administrators on the effectiveness of rape and sexual assault prevention
programming. The community readiness theoretical model provided the foundation to
display the culture and dynamics of a university campus. The research questions
examined the influence programming has on victim reporting to law enforcement and the
capacity of campus community involvement. Through purposive sampling, participants'
perceptions were gathered through semistructured interviews and coded through initial,
axial, and theoretical coding. As a result, five emergent themes explained significant
barriers and support mechanisms in program effectiveness. The results indicated that
intimate programming, integrity, and trust in programming and personnel influenced
student reporting to law enforcement officials. At the same time, education was
imperative for the campus community in instilling and maintaining trust and integrity
among students and social support. The results from this study can contribute to positive
social change by providing program facilitators and campus administrators tools to
implement impactful campus sexual assault programming for campus communities.

Resource Type: PDF

Age: College

Topics: BIPOC, HBCU, LGBTQIA+, activism, advocacy, bullying & cyberbullying, bystander, community educators, consent, gender equity, intimate partner violence, laws & policies, masculinity/men & boys, prevention, sexual harassment, sexual-violence, social media, stalking, survivor-support, title IX

Date Resource Added: May 17, 2022

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